bharatbhasha.com
Free Articles  >>  Travel >>  Page 475  >> 

Thai Individual Life Cycles Part 3





The following day more callers arrive, many bringing small gifts of money to help defray funeral expenses. A family member receives such offerings and keeps a list of contributions so that reciprocal offerings may be made during future funerals.

The body is removed to the temple on the day of the funeral. Within a few days of death an orchestra plays almost continuously from dawn. Every effort is made to dispel sorrow, grief and loneliness by music and fellowship.

After the monks have been ceremoniously fed, mourners circle the funeral pyre. Following further religious rites, the pyre is communally set alight, first by monks, then by family, finally by friends. The corpse is thus consumed by flames amidst a common hope that the deceased, object of such merit-making and affection, will be reborn into a higher existence, to renew another individual life cycle towards the ultimate Buddhist goal of personal perfection.

TWO CULTURES
When speaking of Thai culture, one must distinguish between its two principal but complementary and mutually-reinforc-ing aspects : classical court culture which includes Buddhist art and popular or village Court culture Painters, writers, dancers, sculptors, architects, musicians and skilled craftsmen were considered legitimate spoils of war and were normally transferred from enemy palaces to conquerors’ courts.

In Ayutthaya, actors and dancers were maintained purely for kingly and aristocratic pleasure. Thai artists and architects were responsible for building and decorating palaces, temples and shrines within conventionally acceptable forms and styles. Unlike their Western counterparts, they were not expected to display revolutionary originality or radical inventiveness.

Early literature was primarily concerned with religion and until 1850 was in verse form. Indian poetic styles provided the patterns for Thai verse which was written exclusively by the aristocracy or royalty - the
only leisured, educated classes able to do so. The first known Thai literary work, the Tribhumikatha (The Three Worlds - Hea-ven, Earth and Hell) was a Buddhist cos-mology written by King Lu Thai of Sukho-thai. The kingly tradition of authorship was continued well into the Bangkok period by two Chakri monarchs, Rama II (1809-1824) and Rama VI (Vajiravudh, 1910-1925), both distinguished poets and stalwart patrons of Thai arts.

Much court-inspired art later devolved into simpler forms - for example, classical drama into comic folk operas - to become part of the popular culture. Today, the Thai cultural mosaic retains its original character
but is more varied, particularly in regional folk dance and music where differences are very apparent.

culture.
Most classical Thai art originated in or under the patronage of royal courts. It is an amalgam of the finest cultural traditions of Asia blended into a whole and stamped by artistic genius into unique forms instantly recognizable as Thai. Classical culture also encompasses Buddhist art as represented in temple architecture, decorative murals and Buddha images. Popular culture was village-centred and dealt with planting and harvesting cycles and the basic needs of daily life. Its arts included the creation of utensils, clothing and basketry items.

Court culture reflected the formal, exquisitely complex structure and etiquette of Thai royal palaces with their heavy Indian influence. Popular culture, its predecessor, was concerned with age-old village realities and the simple rites associated with birth, death and the cultivation of crops. Whereas classical poetry, literature, drama, painting, sculpture and architecture expressed religious and intellectual impulses and entertainment was considered to be of secondary value, village culture, despite its religious and moral overtones, was meant, above all else, for entertainment.

But to speak of both in the past tense is only to describe their origins and development ; both are very much alive today.
About Author Manora :

<a href="http://konruk.net/photos/show/seosaroyahoo/4779" target="_blank">http://konruk.net/photos/show/seosaroyahoo/4779</a> <a href="http://konruk.net/photos/show/seosaroyahoo/4778" target="_blank">http://konruk.net/photos/show/seosaroyahoo/4778</a> <a href="http://konruk.net/photos/show/seosaroyahoo/4777" target="_blank">http://konruk.net/photos/show/seosaroyahoo/4777</a>


Article Source: https://www.bharatbhasha.com
Article Url: https://www.bharatbhasha.com/travel.php/203078


Article Added on Sunday, January 10, 2010
LD
Other Articles by Manora

The Charm Of Thai Food
Thai food always has various kinds of vegetables as main ingredients. These can be found in Kaeng Liang, Kaeng Som, Kaeng Noppakaaw, Kaeng Kae, Kaeng Nor Mai. and Kaeng Hua Pli. Of the “yam” (salad) type, are Yam Hua Pli and Yam Kalaampli. There are many foods that are good eaten with vegetables. Isaan’s vermicelli, as well as that of the South, Kaeng Tai Pla and Kaeng Lyan are very delicious having vegetables as their parts. The Som Tam of any region either Issan’s Som Tam Malakor or the...

Village Cycles The Seasonal Cycle The Thai Villagers Life Part 6
Throughout the year, villagers share a common interest in gambling, travelling (pai tiao) and sports. Gambling is a passion. The national lottery excites imaginations in every province, as do cock, bull, fish and cricket-fights by the score. Card games are a pastime favoured by both sexes and almost everyone can play Thai-style chess. Pai tiao by foot, boat, bus, motor bike or rail is a favourite way to relax Travelling makes the villages less insular and personal relations with family and...

Village Cycles The Seasonal Cycle The Thai Villagers Life
The Thai villagers life follows three distinct cycles - a daily cycle, a seasonal cycle of farming and festivals which follow the same annual pattern, and a personal life cycle of infancy and early childhood, childhood, adolescence, maturity and old age. A day begins before dawn when the wife awakens and quietly goes downstairs. In semi-darkness, roosters’ cries disturbing the early morning tranquillity, she lights a charcoal fire and prepares rice for the family breakfast and for the local...

Buddhism Thailand Part 2
Buddhism gained wide acceptance because its emphasis on tolerance and individual initiative complemented the Thais’ cherished inner freedom. Fundamentally, Buddhism is an empirical way of life. Free of dogma, it is a flexible moral, ethical and philosophical framework within which people find room to fashion their own salvations. Sukhothai’s King Ramkamhaeng (1275-1317) established Theravada Buddhism as Thailand's dominant religion. The elder of two major Buddhist schools and closest to the...

Thai Individual Life Cycles
A Thai baby officially becomes ‘some-one’ after its name is chosen-frequently by the village abbot-and entered in the village headman’s records. Soon after birth the child will be given a nickname, usually a colour, attribute or even an animal name suggested by his physical characteristics. Intimates will continue to call him/her by this name for the rest of his life. Childhood is a cossetted, carefree time. By the age of four, children regularly meet to play beyond the family compound. Boys...

Village Cycles The Seasonal Cycle The Thai Villagers Life Part 2
Family members are usually home by five. The animals are brought to the house, fed and tethered. At seven or so the whole family gathers around a kerosene lamp to eat supper and then review the day, chatting together for some time or visiting neigh-bours. By nine the household is asleep. Unless it is the rainy season (the time for night fishing) or a festival is in progress, the entire village is dark, still and quiet from nine until five the following morning. During periods of intensive...

Village Cycles The Seasonal Cycle The Thai Villagers Life Part 3
Shortly after transplanting is completed, the annual monsoons arrive to inundate farmland. Daily rainfall replenishes the fields and much of the family’s time becomes occupied with Rains Retreat observances. During the annual three-month Rains Retreat (Phansa in Thai), Buddhist monks are committed to remaining in their monasteries overnight. The tradition predates Buddhism. In ancient India, all holy men, mendicants and sages spent three months of the annual rainy season in permanent...

The Land and Its People Thailand Part 3
Cherishig personal independence, and seeking to escape the Chinese yoke, compact groups of Thais had migrated southward and settled in northern Thailand centuries before Kublai Khan’s 1253 conquest of Nanchao. The counter-theory holds that the Thais originated in Thailand and were driven northwards by numerically superior Khmers and Mons. There, in Yunnan, the Thais developed their own distinctive culture. Later, under pressure from China’s 11th and 12th century Mongolian conquerors, the Thais...

Food For Health Thai Food
There are no less than 200-300 Thai dishes. Each has its own characteristics in flavor and feature. It is not difficult to cook in the pre-historic era. Humans began their eating with raw trees: flowers, leaves, roots and bulbs. After having tasted the vagetables’bland flavor, they added some sour ones to make tastier, or mixed variety of vegetables. Later, they knew how to make simple cooking, for example, burning vegetables or putting rice into roasted bamboo (which was called “kaawlaam” or...

Herbal Beverages Buabok
Buabok (Ariatic pennywort) Scientific Name:Centella asiatic (L.) Urb. Family:UMBELLIFERAE Other names:Pakwaen (The Southern Part, Chantabrui, The Eastern Part) Pak nork (The Northern Part) Panahaekhadhao (Karen-Mae Hongsorn) Tiakamchao Hukkuk (Chinese) Botanical features: TrunkA short – life cycle plant easily grows on wet soil. Roots grow on the plant’s joints from which leaves straightly develop. Leaves The leaves of Buabok plant are in a single form with long stems and a kindney...

Click here to see More Articles by Manora
Publishers / Webmasters
Article ID: 203078
DELINK URL from Authors Bio
REMOVE Article
Tell A Friend
Leave A Comment!
Download this article in PDF
Report Article!
Search through all the articles:


258 Users Online!!
Related Articles:
Latest Articles:
 
Travel >> Top 50 Articles on Travel
Category - >
Advertising Advice Affiliate Programs Automobiles
Be Your Own Mentor Careers Communication Consumers
CopyWriting Crime Domain Names DoT com Entrepreneur Corner
Ebooks Ecommerce Education Email
Entertainment Environment Family Finance And Business
Food & Drink Gardening Health & Fitness Hobbies
Home Business Home Improvement Humour House Holds
Internet And Computers Kiddos and Teens Legal Matters Mail Order
Management Marketing Marriage MetaPhysical
Motivational MultiMedia Multi Level Marketing NewsLetters
Pets Psychology Religion Parenting
Politics Sales Science Search Engine Optimization
Site Promotion Sports Technology Travel
Web Development Web Hosting WeightLoss Women's Corner
Writing Miscellaneous Articles Real Estate Arts And Crafts
Aging


Disclaimer: The information presented and opinions expressed in the articles are those of the authors
and do not necessarily represent the views of bharatbhasha.com and/or its owners.


Copyright © AwareINDIA. All rights reserved || Privacy Policy || Terms Of Use || Author Guidelines || Free Articles
FAQs Link To Us || Submit An Article || Free Downloads|| Contact Us || Site Map  || Advertise with Us ||
Click here for Special webhosting packages for visitors of this website only!
Vastu Shastra

Web Hosting Provided By AwareIndia







Company IDS